Grangegorman Military Cemetery – Part Five

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

The penultimate part of our tour takes us to Section D, which primarily consists of four rows, along with a short fifth row at the far end, of mainly CWGC headstones, all casualties of the First World War or the Easter Rising. 

Grangegorman Panorama 7

From the southern end of Section D looking back up the rows of headstones; you can see the fifth row just mentioned to the far left of this picture.  We shall visit the men buried there at the end of the post.

Grangegorman Cemetery Plan

In the meantime…

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Private Albert Newland of the 12th (Prince of Wales’s Royal) Lancers died on 2nd May 1916 of wounds received in Dublin during the Rising.  Lance Corporal Clarence Osborne, 5th (Royal Irish) Lancers, was killed during the fighting in Dublin on 27th April 1916.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Private Arthur Smith, 4th (Queen’s Own) Hussars, killed in Dublin, 29th April 1916.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Private Joseph Hosford, Irish Volunteer Training Corps, killed in Dublin, 28th April 1916, shot dead by a sniper through the window of the barracks where he was stationed.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

I know not the fate of Private Browning.  Perhaps a victim of the flu?

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Private George Attwell died of illness in Dublin on 11th September 1920.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

While we are here, you may have spotted these two headstones in the row behind in the previous photo, erected by their comrades in memory of two men of the Wiltshire Regiment who died in Ireland in June 1918.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Corporal Albert Harte-Maxwell, Black Watch & Army Pay Corps, twice wounded during the War, died of sickness in Ireland on 1st September 1919.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Another non-CWGC headstone, this time to Private Harry Evens of the North Somerset Yeomanry, who died on 3rd May 1918.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Above & below: Private Henry Hewett, 2nd King Edward’s Horse, killed during the Rising on 30th April 1916.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Private Arthur Baker, 19th (Queen Alexandra’s Own Royal) Hussars, died in Ireland 27th September 1916.

IMG_1191

Corporal James Headland, 5th (Royal Irish) Lancers, killed during the Rising on 24th April 1916.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Lance Corporal Austin Walton, 10th Reserve Cavalry Regiment, killed in Dublin on 27th April 1916.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Private William Walker, 5th (Royal Irish) Lancers, killed in Dublin on 27th April 1916.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Private Herbert Cordwell, 10th Reserve Cavalry Regiment, killed in Dublin on 24th April 1916.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Above & photos below: The Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby) Regiment lost 28 officers and men during the Rising, many during the fighting at Mount Street Bridge in Dublin on 26th April 1916; these three men were all killed on that day.  Total numbers of wounded from the regiment easily exceeded a hundred.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

The South Staffordshires also lost a number of men during the Rising.  These four soldiers were all killed in Dublin on 29th April 1916.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

More casualties of the Battle of Mount Street Bridge; men of the Sherwood Foresters, killed in Dublin on 26th April 1916.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Private Arthur Scarlett, 5th Lancers, Company Quartermaster Serjeant David Tempest, South Staffordshire Regiment, and Private Abraham Watchorn, Royal Dublin Fusiliers.  All killed in Dublin during the Rising.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Above & below: You will have noticed part of a non-CWGC headstone in the second row in the previous picture.  Unfortunately the first letter of this soldier’s surname is now missing, but he died on 2nd March 1915 of wounds received in action.

Update June 2014:  I gather his headstone has now been repaired and we know his name – see John’s comment at the end of this post.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Two men of the North Staffordshire Regiment; Private James Cornwell, who died of wounds in Dublin on 2nd May 1916, and Private Harold Brindley, killed on 28th April 1916.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Two Sherwood Foresters, Privates George Wyld and Thomas Miller, both killed at Mount Street Bridge on 26th April 1916.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Wilfred LLewellyn died on 29th April 1916, the only man of the Pembroke Yeomanry to be killed during the Rising.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Even a Shoeing Smith lost his life; Charles O’Gorman, 10th Reserve Regiment of Cavalry, was killed on 24th April 1916.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Private James Chick and Corporal John Barratt, South Staffs Regiment, both killed on 29th April 1916.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Above & following seven photos: First World War casualties, all wounded in 1915 and evacuated to Ireland where they succumbed to their injuries.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Beneath this non-CWGC headstone lies another man who died of wounds in Dublin in 1915; Lance Corporal John Murray, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Back at the southern end of Section D, this white cross (above & below) remembers Squadron Quartermaster Serjeant Charles Taylor, 5th Royal Irish Lancers, who died on 6th December 1915.  ‘Erected by the N.C.Os. 6th Reserve Regiment of Cavalry’.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

And finally, the fifth row I mentioned much earlier contains just seven burials, all men who died before the first Christmas of the War…

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

…Private Thomas Abel, 4th (Queen’s Own) Hussars, less than two weeks after hostilities commenced.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

General view of Section D; in the left background you can see the Grangegorman Memorial, which we shall visit, along with the memorial headstones in Section N (see photo below), in the final part of our tour.

Grangegorman Military Cemetery

This entry was posted in Ireland: The Great War, U.K. Churches, Memorials & Cemeteries - Back in Blighty. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Grangegorman Military Cemetery – Part Five

  1. John Cooke says:

    Visited Grangegorman this morning –

    Above & below: You will have noticed part of a non-CWGC headstone in the second row in the previous picture. Unfortunately the first letter of this soldier’s surname is now missing, but he died on 2nd March 1915 of wounds received in action.

    His name is clear now – George Herbert Jannings and I have uploaded a picture to the Find a grave website

  2. Magicfingers says:

    Thanks John, I have updated the post accordingly.

  3. I am researching the Battalion adjutant on the day of the Battle of Mount Street Bridge , Captain Fred Dietrichsen , of Nottingham , who , along with many of his men , was killed in this action. I know he is buried in Dublin , but have been unable to locate his grave. Can anyone possibly help , please?

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