Tweedmouth Cemetery – World War I

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A remarkable place, Tweedmouth Cemetery.  At least to my eyes.  Although there are only three First World War CWGC headstones to be found here, a close inspection of as many as possible of the other headstones revealed no less than forty one inscriptions to husbands, sons and brothers killed in action in France, Flanders or further afield.

On none of my other trips around the countryside have I come across anything like that number, although I suspect there are clear social and economic reasons why this so sadly turned out to be the case, and I have no doubt there are many other places that can boast similar numbers.

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So take a silent trip with me around Tweedmouth Cemetery, where so many local young men are remembered for laying down their lives for King and Country in a foreign field.  Some of the inscriptions are difficult to read, and you will find quite a few close-ups to aid your viewing, but don’t forget you can click on the photos to enlarge them (another click should make the huge, depending on your browser).

Ok.  Here we go.

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149

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210

276

243

145

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Panorama 2

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253

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166

220

179

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259

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222

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172

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268

Panorama

Panorama 4

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Panorama 3

169

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228

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Peter Lamb was a Leading Signalman aboard H.M.S. Victory based in Portsmouth.

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Seaman George Robertson, Royal Naval Reserve, is buried in Gillingham (Woodlands) Cemetery, Kent.

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Panorama 5

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187

119

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181

267

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164 (2)

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143

170

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So many.  And what I haven’t yet mentioned is that there are a considerable number of World War II burials and commemorations here as well.  As you will see at a later date.

This entry was posted in Northumberland, U.K. Cemeteries - Back in Blighty. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Tweedmouth Cemetery – World War I

  1. Steve Oliver says:

    Just to let you know I visited this blog on Northumberland graves. You certainly travel afar. Barb and I had a day trip out of Edinburgh 5 years ago to the region.

    • Magicfingers says:

      Cool. Tweedmouth Cemetery in particular was an eye-opener – so many names, and yet, if you think about it, what did you do in the North East for a job in the early 20th Century? Agriculture, industry (mining), fishing, and the army, I guess. Yes, I do travel afar when opportunity presents itself – have just come back from Cornwall, and although I have visited many of the war memorials etc in the county, there are still plenty still to do. Just a couple on this trip though.

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