Newlyn War Memorial

We’re flying around the country at the moment in these Back in Blighty posts, so here’s another Cornish war memorial for your pleasure.

Nearby:

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13 Responses to Newlyn War Memorial

  1. SECOND LIEUTENANT
    WILLIAM ALEXANDER STANHOPE FORBES
    Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry 3rd Bn. attd. 1st Bn.
    Died 03 September 1916
    Age 23 years old
    Buried or commemorated at
    GUILLEMONT ROAD CEMETERY, GUILLEMONT I. A. 1. France
    Son of Stanhope Alexander Forbes and Elizabeth Adela Forbes, of Higher Fangan, Newlyn, Penzance. Student of the Royal Architectural Association.
    Personal Inscription
    HE SAW BEYOND THE FILTH OF BATTLE, AND THOUGHT DEATH A FAIR PRICE TO PAY TO BELONG TO THE COMPANY OF THESE FELLOWS

  2. He is the son of Stanhope Forbes, one of the Newlyn School of painters.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanhope_Forbes

    I’ve seen the family grave at Sancreed.
    My Grandfather’s family came from Newlyn.
    I remember standing by the War Memorial in the last war to see the Queen pass by.

  3. Margaret Draycott says:

    What’s always astonishing about these memorials is the number of men listed given that these were relatively small communities.
    I agree the sculpture of William Stanhope Forbes displayed in the church is beautiful,
    Thanks for info Kathryn if you look up Returnedftf on the web it’s a project to record all original ww1 crosses remaining in this country, you will find the write up for Stanhope Forbes there.

    He’s a handsome chap…..the seagull of course.

  4. Nick Kilner says:

    It must be ten years or more since I was last in Newlyn, lovely spot.
    Splendid memorial, but so many names from such a small community. It must have devastated the local fishing industry for a generation

    • Magicfingers says:

      I like the fact you know (many of) these Cornish memorials – still a few more to come.

      • Nick Kilner says:

        And I very much enjoy seeing them, a good number for the first time. This has just reminded me of some research I had planned to do on Richard Preston from the St. Just in Roseland plaque who was awarded both the M.C. and the C de G. Have you covered that one yet? I’ve just looked him up on the CWGC website, but it still seems plagued with problems :-(. Might just be because in on the iPad but I can’t access the GRRF’s this morning. Hopefully they’re getting busy sorting it out. Looks like he was a Lieutenant Colonel with the RAMC so it may be possible to trace his actions

        • Nick Kilner says:

          I think I must have ‘moving house’ brain at the minute, just realised it was St Just in Roseland church we were discussing a short while ago. In my defence, whilst I hadnt visited the church, I had seen the names on two memorial plaques down on the promenade in the village, which is why I hadn’t made the connection.
          I found some info on Richard Preston on the RAMC in WW1 site. Looks like he died in what was probably his own CCS in Sézanne

          • Magicfingers says:

            I’ll give you moving house brain on this occasion! We were discussing it, yes. There’s a family memorial in the churchyard to him which I photographed: http://thebignote.com/2016/02/06/st-just-in-roseland-church-churchyard/
            GRRFs still not available.
            And one of the last postcards was of Sézanne.

          • Nick kilner says:

            So it was! How funny. And yes, I spotted the family memorial when I went back through the post again. My brain is clearly somewhat addled at the minute, but less than a week to go now till the big day. Today is empty the loft day! I’d forgotten just how much fun moving house is….

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