Category Archives: Ireland 1916-1923

The Easter Rising, War of Independence & Civil War

Dublin – Glasnevin Cemetery Part One: The Republican Plot & Elsewhere

Glasnevin Cemetery is the largest cemetery in Ireland, covering some 120 acres, more than a million and a half souls having been buried here since it was opened in 1832.

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Dublin – Arbour Hill Cemetery

Arbour Hill Cemetery was opened in about 1840, as a military burial ground for soldiers based at the adjacent Royal Barracks.

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The Easter Rising Part Ten – Moore Street

The final acts of the Easter Rising took place here, in the narrow cobbled streets behind the rebel headquarters at the GPO.

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The Easter Rising Part Nine – Boland’s Mill & Beggars Bush Barracks

Thanks to a very kind (and deliberately slow) taxi driver, I managed to get some shots of Boland’s Mill as we passed by (this one taken as the mill receded into the distance).

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The Easter Rising Part Eight – Mount Street Bridge

The Grand Canal, Dublin, with Mount Street Bridge in the background.  Some of the heaviest fighting during the Rising took place around the bridge on Wednesday 26th April 1916, as the Sherwood Foresters, bruised and battered as they fought their … Continue reading

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The Easter Rising Part Seven – Northumberland Road

On the morning of Wednesday 26th April 1916, British reinforcements began to arrive in Ireland, disembarking at Kingstown (now Dún Laoghaire), and moving towards the south eastern outskirts of Dublin.  Ordered to make their way by the most direct route … Continue reading

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The Easter Rising Part Six – Royal (Collins) Barracks & the Four Courts

Royal Barracks, as it was known at the time of the Rising, is the second oldest public building in Dublin, after the Royal Hospital, Kilmainham – see last post – dating back to 1701.

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