The Road to Passchendaele Part Three – Bridge House Cemetery

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Less than half a mile across the fields to the east of Seaforth Cemetery Cheddar Villa, we find one of the smallest cemeteries in the whole Ypres salient. Continue reading

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Seaforth Cemetery Cheddar Villa

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As you know, we recently visited two little cemeteries tucked away in the fields to the north east of Ieper, just off of the road to Sint-Juliaan (St. Julien, as was). Continue reading

Posted in Langemarck | 2 Comments

This Bloody Field…

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Apologies for the lack of posts recently, folks, but sometimes real life interferes.  To keep you going, here’s a picture of a field.  Not just any field, though.  No.  The date is 1st July 1916, and this is the view you and your fellow Yorkshiremen would have had as the whistles blew early that morning and you extricated yourself from your trench to assault the German front lines situated on the crest of the rise.

Very possibly the last view you would ever see.

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With the British Army on the Somme

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Sometime early last year… Continue reading

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La Brique Military Cemetery No.2

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Directly across the road from La Brique Military Cemetery No.1, La Brique Military Cemetery No.2 is far larger, and was in use for much longer, than its neighbour. Continue reading

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La Brique Military Cemetery No.1

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It doesn’t matter which route, nor which direction, you take out of Ypres (Ieper), you will soon come across British military cemeteries at the side of the road, and the road to Pilckem, away to the north east of the city, is no exception.  Except, I suppose, that there’s a cemetery on either side at this point. Continue reading

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The Road to Passchendaele Part Two – Track X Cemetery

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Track X Cemetery is sited in what was once No Man’s Land prior to 31st July 1917, the opening day of the Third Battle of Ypres.  The distance between the opposing trenches at this point was little more than a hundred yards, and this view, taken from just in front of the British front line, looks east, towards the German lines. Continue reading

Posted in St. Jean, Third Ypres & Passchendaele | 2 Comments