Zandvoorde – The Household Cavalry Monument

Modern development means that the Household Cavalry Monument at Zandvoorde is now accessed by a narrow alleyway between two buildings.

We shall sign the register on our way out.

The 7th Cavalry Brigade (Household Cavalry), consisting of the 1st & 2nd Life Guards and the Royal Horse Guards, relieved the 6th Cavalry Brigade at Zandvoorde on October 27th 1914, holding it until October 30th when intense German pressure finally forced them to retreat from the ridge.  Their trenches were completely destroyed by artillery fire and they suffered heavy casualties before and during their retirement.  The memorial, unveiled on May 4th 1924 by Lord Haig, commemorates 120 men of the 1st Life Guards, 114 men of the 2nd Life Guards, and 62 men of the Horse Guards, the majority of whom were killed defending the ridge at Zandvoorde.

Best I could do.

         

Time for home now.  I need tea.

Update April 2014:  As Frank Mahieu informs us in his comment below, the monument has been renovated since my visit.  Frank sent me some recent photos he took, and has kindly allowed me to post a few of them to show you the monument as it is today:

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Now that’s a lot better.  Thanks Frank.

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17 Responses to Zandvoorde – The Household Cavalry Monument

  1. Keith Buckeridge says:

    When we visited the monument 2 years ago, because my great uncle is on it, it was in a poor state as can be seen on your photos, so I contacted the Household Cavalry to see if it could be cleaned. My brother and I visited again last October to check if it had been done and were pleased to see that it had been thoroughly cleaned , the monument was gleaming, the bushes and trees had be pruned, the path was clean and even the wall where the visitors book is kept. I contacted them on our return to thank them.

  2. Magicfingers says:

    Good job Keith. I passed through Zandvoorde in January and had I known I would have taken some new photos, but I expect to be back later in the year and I shall make sure I take some photos of the refurbished monument then.

  3. franky mahieu says:

    Hi, I just visited the Monument this week, with the “30th October 1914” actions in my mind, thinking of Lt. Lord Worsley who fought & fell there and was buried respectfully at the very spot by the Germans. I do have some photos of the monument as it is now, if interested, just say. Flemish Regards from Flanders 🙂

  4. Magicfingers says:

    Hello Franky. Yes, I did say I’d go back to take some new photos and I have yet to do so. Until I do I’d be very interested in seeing the photos you took. How do you suggest?

  5. frank mahieu says:

    well, I suggest I could send the photos by email

  6. Jenni Spice says:

    Hi
    I have just yesterday discovered that this is where my Great Uncle Hugh Ervin was killed and discovered these pictures. I am thrilled. Until now we only had one photograph taken of him in the Household Cavalry Musical Ride in 1912. If anyone has anymore information or pictures I would be delighted to see them
    Thankyou

    • franky mahieu says:

      Your grandfather, Jennie, doesn’t happen to be Hugh Glass Ervin, corporal of Horse 1222, Royal Horse Guards, K.I.A. on 30 October 1914?
      http://www.sthelensrollsofhonour.co.uk/casualty-3328-Hugh_Glass_Ervin.html

      • Martin White says:

        Hi Franky,
        I am on a project looking for war graves and family memorials around Northern Ireland. On Saturday I was in Dromara and took a photo for a family Ervin. On the Headstone there was an inscription for a Brownlow Ervin, killed in action 30th October 1914. When researching the name I could not find anything. On the CWGC site the only Ervin that came up for the date of death, was Hugh Glass Ervin. So I put this information into Google and this site came up. I came upon your post and clicked onto the link. Which I have to thank you for because this confirmed to me the two were the same person. On the headstone the fathers name is, Samuel James Ervin died 20th March 1934 age 76, Mothers name Sarah Jane died 8th September 1937 age 78. Two other sons are mentioned, Thomas David died 24th November 1972 and Samuel James died 21st November 1978. If any of the relitives would like a copy of the photo they are more than welcome. Just send me an EMail address and I will be more than happy to send it to them.
        Martin White

    • Magicfingers says:

      Hi Jenni. Glad you found the photos! I reckon Frank knows a bit about the actions here in 1914. I get the feeling he’d be happy to help if you are doing some research.

    • Alex Brading (nee Ervin) says:

      I just can’t believe what I am reading; all those poor souls and my Great Uncle is also Hugh Glass Ervin…….my Father, John Brownlow Ervin, whom is now 86, has always wanted to go and find his Uncle and we (my sister, mother, father and our husbands) are going there this week to find him…..so Jenni Spice we are related! I had heard there were twins in the family (as we have twin boys) but couldn’t find them on the Family Bible.
      Anyway, I’ll stop rambling and hope you contact me………life moves in strange ways! Thanks, Alex

  7. franky mahieu says:

    Hello Jennie, Nice you like the photos. At the very place of the memorial, Lord Worsley (Charles Pelham) was killed on 31 oCT. 1914. I would like to know more about your late grandfather as well. So, if you like …
    Frank Mahieu.

  8. lorraine gove says:

    Lovely to find these pictures and my great great grand fathers name david black of the 2nd life guards. I hope to visit one day

  9. The story of the memorial and the men commemorated are on a dedicated website.

    http://zvmem.householdcavalrymemorial.org.uk

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