Zandvoorde War Memorial & Churchyard

The church of St. Bartholomew at Zandvoorde, destroyed during the First World War and rebuilt in the 1920s.

Outside the church, Zandvoorde War Memorial commemorates both civilian and military dead of the Great War.

A CWGC information board next to the war memorial describes the action here in October 1914.  We shall visit the Household Cavalry Memorial (pictured bottom left) shortly.

As we enter the churchyard the CWGC headstones are immediately visible to the north of the church.

There are four men of the 10th Hussars buried here, all victims of the fighting on 26th October 1914.  And how appropriate, and symbolic of the British Army of 1914, that a knighted Captain lies next to a Lieutenant, a Lance Corporal and a Private.

CAPTAIN Sir F. S. D. ROSE10th (PRINCE OF WALES'S OWN) ROYAL HUSSARS3726/10/19141

LIEUTENANT C. R. TURNOR10th (PRINCE OF WALES'S OWN) ROYAL HUSSARS2826/10/19142

LANCE CORPORAL J. WAUGH10th (PRINCE OF WALES'S OWN) ROYAL HUSSARSu/k26/10/19143

PRIVATE R. S. MACKENZIE10th (PRINCE OF WALES'S OWN) ROYAL HUSSARSu/k26/10/19144

Four days after these men died the Germans took the village of Zantvoorde (as it was called at the time, and as, you will have noticed, Zantvoorde British Cemetery is still called).  It remained in their hands until September 1918.

Grey skes over Zandvoorde village.

Zandvoorde village square.

Signposts in the square to Ieper (Ypres), Wervik (on the border with France), and Zantvoorde British Cemetery. Our final stop, the Household Cavalry Memorial I mentioned earlier, is just a few hundred yards down the road towards Wervik.

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